Saturday, October 11, 2008

Great Moments in Guilty Consciences

It's never too late to do the right thing:
Bob Natiello, who grew up in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, is a retired New York advertising executive living in Sedona, Ariz. But in a letter to me not long ago, he pleaded guilty to his life of crime as a turnstile boy at Ebbets Field in 1944, when a seventh-place Dodgers team played there. Instead of turning over his confession to the authorities, I’m reprinting much of it here, with his permission, as a lesson to anyone who may be tempted to betray an employer . . .

. . . “When we close the gate, the ticket taker says: ‘Meet me by the hot dog stand under the third-base ramp in half an hour.’ I don’t think twice about accepting the folded bills he hands me. ‘This is your share. Don’t let on where you got it.’ It’s clear now: the ticket-seller resold the retained tickets and pocketed the money. I’m happy to pick up an extra three dollars” . . .

. . . “I’ve discovered, that there is no statute of limitations on conscience,” Natiello wrote. “To ease mine, the enclosed $100 check, payable to the Los Angeles Dodgers, should wipe the slate clean. It includes a reasonable amount to cover six decades of accrued interest. I hope it’s enough to atone for the $6 larceny that took place over 60 years ago.”
Unfortunately it didn't atone. To the contrary, the Dodgers have exploited a little known loophole in the statute of limitations, have pressed criminal charges against him, and are suing him for fraud and conversion.

True story.

4 comments:

blaze said...

Those Dodgers. Heh heh.

Anonymous said...

It appears that the Dodgers deserve Manny.

Anonymous said...

So this kid gets handed $ 6 over 60 years ago and feels bad about it. The Dodgers file criminal charges.

What will the Dodgers do in 60 years to Chan Ho Park?

Anonymous said...

So this kid gets handed $ 6 over 60 years ago and feels bad about it. The Dodgers file criminal charges.

What will the Dodgers do in 60 years to Chan Ho Park?