Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Truly a Cathedral

New Yankee Stadium is sounding increasingly awful:
A Hard Rock Cafe will open in the new Yankee Stadium.

The 7,000-square-foot restaurant will operate year-round in right field when the park makes its debut next season, the two organizations announced Wednesday. Above it will be a restaurant called NYY Steak, a joint venture by the Yankees' parent company and Seminole Hard Rock Entertainment. Other NYY Steak branches could also be opened in other parts of the country.

Patrons without tickets will be able to eat at both restaurants on game days. The field will not be visible from either location.
You know, if you're going to install a crappy, kitsch-filled barfatorium like Hard Rock, you should probably at least install a couple of windows so people can watch a ballgame while they eat their $17 Clapton-Burgers.

16 comments:

Mr. Thursday said...

The Phillies have something like this. McFadden's isn't a chain, I don't think, but it's a crappy, overcrowded bar with no view of the field (though, of course, there are TVs a-plenty with the game on). The cheesesteaks are chewy, the roast pork is non-existent, and the beer is served in plastic cups. Every time I leave the park, I can hear some cover band belting out Tom Petty/ACDC/other 1980s popular rock.

The only value the place has is to stay dry in during rain delays. Of course, those of us who actually go to games for the baseball get wet during rain delays because, (1), we like it, and (2) going indoors means missing the inevitable slip'n'slide and streakers.

Not Really This Bitter said...

Sounds a perfect match. Yankees deserve nothing less than overpriced crap.

Daniel said...

Now tell us how you REALLY feel about Hard Rock.

Jason said...

The Yanks are putting a @#$%^& Hard Rock Cafe in TNYS. Seriously, a Hard Rock? Just a terrible decision. I'll try not to get all food snobbish on you, but putting a Hard Rock in Yankee Stadium, when you have so many better options, just sucks. If you have to put a chain in, put a Houston's or something else. Shoot, why not just put a Linens 'N Things in the Bleachers and a Christmas Tree Shops in the bullpen and we can call the Stadium "The Great American StripMallPark".

grrrrrrrr.....

tadthebad said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
tadthebad said...

There are Christmas Tree Shops in New York?

drpaisley said...

McFadden's just opened a branch across from the new Sprint/Your Name Here Real Soon Now Center in downtown KC. Not planning on checking it out (Flying Saucer, on the other hand, has 70+ beers on tap).

But this all makes me so happy. What George couldn't destroy, Hank will manage to degrade to the point no one will care.

Peter said...

I want to know why the Hard Rock isn't available to people who are actually attending the game.

You're paying more to see a ballgame than you normally would...why not pay more to eat an Applebee's-level microwaved burger while you're at it?

Anonymous said...

Wow. I was stunned when I saw this on Si.com.

I'm the anti-traditionalist. I hate fans who whine incessantly about modern accoutrements ruining baseball. I also hate the Yankees.

But Hard Rock Cafe in Yankee Stadium? Even Babe Ruth would not have been pleased.

I mean, if nothing else, why not create a Yankee- or baseball-themed kitschy crap-steraunt that's open year round and available to non ticket-holders?

-Amos

matt said...

Mr. Thursday's dead on about McFaddens at Citizen's Bank Park. The only time I've been in there is to watch Flyers or Sixers playoff games during rain delays or blowouts in Phils games.

Imagine my surprise and delight when I visited PNC Park in Pittsburgh and discovered a club in left field from which I could watch game 2 of the Flyers-Canadians series on tv and look out onto the field where the Phillies and Pirates were playing. I'm not sure why more stadiums don't have something like this.

Anonymous said...

How is this any different from the other bad restaurants and bars they stick into new stadiums? People love to mock the yankees for taking their history too seriously, yet they have no problem using it against them in this case. Convenient...

Craig Calcaterra said...

Anon: the problem is that I am 100% confident that the Yankees will continue to take their history seriously -- and will take the "history" of the Hard Rock Cafe seriously too -- despite the addition of this tourist trap. If there is any evidence whatsoever that the addition of this restaurant is going to usher in a new casual age in which the Yankees cease making constant reference to how classy and important an organization they are, I'll change my view.

Osmodious said...

As of Opening Day next year, my beloved Yankees have given up their right to EVER say a single damned word about their 'tradition' and 'legacy' and history...because they will have torn it down and moved across the street from it.

It hurts to think that the Red Sox have the moral high ground on the whole history thing, but they do now.

As for the Hard Rock, not much of a shock there...I'm just waiting for the big Verizon logo in chalk behind home plate...it will happen, someday.

Anonymous said...

Do the Yankees ever actually refer to themselves as a "classy" organization...or is it just talking heads like Kaye and Sterling?

The current stadium has two restaurants/pubs you can hang out in before/during games: the Pinstripe Pub and the Sony Stadium club. Would it have made any difference if the name on the sign all these years said Ruby Tuesday's or a TGIF? Give me a break...

Osmodious said...

Well, the Yankees tend to show some class when it comes to the baseball side of things...the business side, though, I'm not so certain. (an example of the kind of things the baseball Yankees do...when they were no-hit by the Astros a few years ago, each of the participating Astros pitchers had a bottle of expensive champagne sitting by their locker after the game...)

And, while Ruby Tuesday or TGIF would not necessarily be welcome to the fans, they are at least a few notches below Hard Rock in terms of crass commercialism (e.g. your burger is made with real meat and is not double the price because you are sitting underneath Elvis Presley's glass encased long-johns).

Anonymous said...

Is there really a difference between the "crass commercialism" of the Hard Rock and paying 8.50 for flat beer in a paper cup that came from dirty taps? I guess it depends on your definition of crass, but the whole park is full of over priced items and concessions. The only thing that isn't commercialized in the whole stadium is the name.